Dickson discusses meshed grids

WindEurope CEO Giles Dickson took part in a high-level panel discussion on the potential benefits of meshed offshore grids in Europe.

The panel discussion took place at the mid-term project conference organised by the Horizon 2020 project PROMOTioN (PROgress on Meshed HVDC Offshore Transmission Networks).

Dickson said that a meshed offshore grid should not be the goal in itself; rather, it should be treated as a means of deploying competitive wind generation across the North Sea.

He said that an efficient North Sea, would unlock the exchange of energy between countries, with no curtailment, bringing energy from places with higher wind resources.

Several key EU projects – including PROMOTioN and Best Paths – demonstrate how HVDC (high voltage, direct current) technology is evolving. Advanced wind turbine converters, along with smarter HVDC converters, will be a key pillar to support system operations and maintain system security.

Already, Dickson said, HVDC interconnectors provide a vast amount of flexibility for Transmission System Operators (TSOs).

But the biggest challenge, Dickson said, remains with the current regulatory framework. Today, investors are not encouraged to develop wind farms and infrastructure that are ready for future meshed grids. Instead, investors compete in auctions on the lowest price, a process which ensures that there will only be a single connection point to a single onshore substation.

He also said that as long as this doesn't change future retrofitting needs to take place for a meshed grid. According to him there is a lack of incentive to from investors.

Here, Dickson addressed the role that TSOs can play in addressing the obstacles to meshed grids. Today TSOs are building point-to-point (country to country) interconnectors to reap the benefits of wholesale price differences between markets. This allows wind farms to plug in to their interconnector, potentially reducing the income for TSOs and thus decreasing the incentive to adapt the existing infrastructure.

However, in some countries, the TSO is in charge of deploying the grid. As the TSO is regulated in these countries, it has the potential to develop an optimal solution for both the wind promoters and grid promoters. This is because the possibility of achieving ‘hybrid projects’ is much higher. Hybrid projects are projects that feed electricity to two different markets, as exemplified in Kriegers Flag, part of a 400 MW interconnector between Denmark and Germany.

Here, Dickson outlined a number of recommendations to unlock the potential for hybrid projects, as proposed by WindEurope’s Offshore Working Group:

1.        Hybrid projects, comprising offshore wind energy and grid interconnectors should add volumes to the existing pipeline.

2.        Hybrid projects should be subject to competition, including project elements.

3.        Pilot hybrid projects shall be carefully selected in such a way that they will not jeopardise current plans and investments and should benefit from compensation schemes.

4.        Hybrid projects should build on the short to medium term development plans from governments.

5.        The future framework should be clarified by designing a European Offshore Grid blueprint to 2030 and beyond.

6.        The most economically-beneficial sites should be developed first.

A meshed European offshore transmission grid connecting offshore wind farms to shore could provide significant financial, technical and environmental benefits to the European electricity market. Launched in January 2016, PROMOTioN aims to explore and identify these potential benefits.

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